2) Data

Today, data is one of the most discussed and controversial topics in our industry.  

We believe marketers should only use ethically-sourced data and evaluate their campaigns to ensure the ethical use of data.

When it comes to data, most marketers are mainly focused on compliance with GDPR and CCPA. Failure to comply with data privacy laws comes with stiff fines that no one wants to pay.

Compliance so far has mostly pushed the marketing world to throw up site-wide popups and checkboxes on forms. But is this really the best way to comply with the law and meet everyone's privacy needs? Is anyone happy to see those popups? Does anyone even read those terms and conditions? 

To understand data in a digital marketing context, let’s start by looking at something we’re very familiar with: the “funnel” (AKA the buyer’s journey). It looks like this:

  1. Data is collected
  2. Data is enriched and analyzed
  3. Data is used for marketing purposes

Within this funnel, there are ethical considerations at each step, illustrated by these examples:

Collection

  • Ethical example: people know what they’re signing up for, exchange of value is clear.
  • Unethical example: deceptive advertising, psychologically scammy copy, “implied” consent to be contacted that isn’t really granted outright.

 Enrichment + Analytics

  • Ethical example: aggregate data used to make marketing decisions to help customers and improve products.
  • Unethical example: a “creepy” level of detail is tracked on individually identifiable people.

 Use

  • Ethical example: Marketers running a campaign have good intentions on delivering value to their audience, with a reasonably accurate match of goods & services to the audience’s wants/needs.
  • Unethical example: Marketers spam “buy now!” emails to their list every day until the list is burned, and then move on to a new list. 

We have a new way of thinking about this data funnel that we’d like to introduce as a better fit for data in a marketing context: the data supply chain. Essentially, the data supply chain is the steps through which people’s data travels from source to use within a marketing campaign. 

Further, we believe that transparency is especially important in the ethical use of data. If you don’t know where your data comes from, it may not have been ethically sourced. Similarly, if you source data that is used by other marketers, you may be complicit in unethical use of people’s data.

Image

2) Data

Today, data is one of the most discussed and controversial topics in our industry.  

We believe marketers should only use ethically-sourced data and evaluate their campaigns to ensure the ethical use of data.

When it comes to data, most marketers are mainly focused on compliance with GDPR and CCPA. Failure to comply with data privacy laws comes with stiff fines that no one wants to pay.

Compliance so far has mostly pushed the marketing world to throw up site-wide popups and checkboxes on forms. But is this really the best way to comply with the law and meet everyone's privacy needs? Is anyone happy to see those popups? Does anyone even read those terms and conditions? 

To understand data in a digital marketing context, let’s start by looking at something we’re very familiar with: the “funnel” (AKA the buyer’s journey). It looks like this:

  1. Data is collected
  2. Data is enriched and analyzed
  3. Data is used for marketing purposes

Within this funnel, there are ethical considerations at each step, illustrated by these examples:

Collection

  • Ethical example: people know what they’re signing up for, exchange of value is clear.
  • Unethical example: deceptive advertising, psychologically scammy copy, “implied” consent to be contacted that isn’t really granted outright.

 Enrichment + Analytics

  • Ethical example: aggregate data used to make marketing decisions to help customers and improve products.
  • Unethical example: a “creepy” level of detail is tracked on individually identifiable people.

 Use

  • Ethical example: Marketers running a campaign have good intentions on delivering value to their audience, with a reasonably accurate match of goods & services to the audience’s wants/needs.
  • Unethical example: Marketers spam “buy now!” emails to their list every day until the list is burned, and then move on to a new list. 

We have a new way of thinking about this data funnel that we’d like to introduce as a better fit for data in a marketing context: the data supply chain. Essentially, the data supply chain is the steps through which people’s data travels from source to use within a marketing campaign. 

Further, we believe that transparency is especially important in the ethical use of data. If you don’t know where your data comes from, it may not have been ethically sourced. Similarly, if you source data that is used by other marketers, you may be complicit in unethical use of people’s data.

Image

2) Data

Today, data is one of the most discussed and controversial topics in our industry.  

We believe marketers should only use ethically-sourced data and evaluate their campaigns to ensure the ethical use of data.

When it comes to data, most marketers are mainly focused on compliance with GDPR and CCPA. Failure to comply with data privacy laws comes with stiff fines that no one wants to pay.

Compliance so far has mostly pushed the marketing world to throw up site-wide popups and checkboxes on forms. But is this really the best way to comply with the law and meet everyone's privacy needs? Is anyone happy to see those popups? Does anyone even read those terms and conditions? 

To understand data in a digital marketing context, let’s start by looking at something we’re very familiar with: the “funnel” (AKA the buyer’s journey). It looks like this:

  1. Data is collected
  2. Data is enriched and analyzed
  3. Data is used for marketing purposes

Within this funnel, there are ethical considerations at each step, illustrated by these examples:

Collection

  • Ethical example: people know what they’re signing up for, exchange of value is clear.
  • Unethical example: deceptive advertising, psychologically scammy copy, “implied” consent to be contacted that isn’t really granted outright.

 Enrichment + Analytics

  • Ethical example: aggregate data used to make marketing decisions to help customers and improve products.
  • Unethical example: a “creepy” level of detail is tracked on individually identifiable people.

 Use

  • Ethical example: Marketers running a campaign have good intentions on delivering value to their audience, with a reasonably accurate match of goods & services to the audience’s wants/needs.
  • Unethical example: Marketers spam “buy now!” emails to their list every day until the list is burned, and then move on to a new list. 

We have a new way of thinking about this data funnel that we’d like to introduce as a better fit for data in a marketing context: the data supply chain. Essentially, the data supply chain is the steps through which people’s data travels from source to use within a marketing campaign. 

Further, we believe that transparency is especially important in the ethical use of data. If you don’t know where your data comes from, it may not have been ethically sourced. Similarly, if you source data that is used by other marketers, you may be complicit in unethical use of people’s data.