4) Sustainability

Sustainable business practices are important to our team. And we are not alone. Increasingly, more and more consumers want to see their market choices create a positive impact on society and the environment. 

Accordingly, brands have to align with the priorities of their customers. This means that even companies with vested interests in fossil fuel production (think: BP) are launching campaigns around sustainability. 

But what does this shift towards sustainability mean for digital marketers? 

We believe that marketers should be as transparent as possible about the sustainability of their brands and products, and actively work to improve unsustainable products and practices where possible.

For many companies, ourselves and our clients included, sustainability is a journey. No company is perfect. It’s the work we do to increase the sustainability of our brands and products that makes a difference. So, for marketers in this position we advocate two things: being transparent about your company’s sustainability now, and working towards a more sustainable future. That might be driven by product marketing, market data showing consumer demand for sustainable options, or something else.

What does this look like in practice?

Marketing for sustainable and not-so-sustainable products alike, here are some do’s and don’ts you can adopt to really bring it home:

Follow ethical practices like these:

  • Prioritize working with companies that value sustainability
  • Be honest about the sustainability of your product
  • If you are working on an unsustainable product, work to improve sustainability practices at the product-marketing level
  • Get certified, and talk about your certifications in your marketing materials

Avoid the following unethical practices:

  • Greenwashing
  • Promoting your company as sustainable when it causes environmental harm
  • Using plastics at every stop along your supply chain

As marketers, we have the power to create (and amplify) change. The quality and scale of that change depends largely on the product. But you can still make sustainable choices in your marketing strategy regardless of the brands you’re tied to.

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4) Sustainability

Sustainable business practices are important to our team. And we are not alone. Increasingly, more and more consumers want to see their market choices create a positive impact on society and the environment. 

Accordingly, brands have to align with the priorities of their customers. This means that even companies with vested interests in fossil fuel production (think: BP) are launching campaigns around sustainability. 

But what does this shift towards sustainability mean for digital marketers? 

We believe that marketers should be as transparent as possible about the sustainability of their brands and products, and actively work to improve unsustainable products and practices where possible.

For many companies, ourselves and our clients included, sustainability is a journey. No company is perfect. It’s the work we do to increase the sustainability of our brands and products that makes a difference. So, for marketers in this position we advocate two things: being transparent about your company’s sustainability now, and working towards a more sustainable future. That might be driven by product marketing, market data showing consumer demand for sustainable options, or something else.

What does this look like in practice?

Marketing for sustainable and not-so-sustainable products alike, here are some do’s and don’ts you can adopt to really bring it home:

Follow ethical practices like these:

  • Prioritize working with companies that value sustainability
  • Be honest about the sustainability of your product
  • If you are working on an unsustainable product, work to improve sustainability practices at the product-marketing level
  • Get certified, and talk about your certifications in your marketing materials

Avoid the following unethical practices:

  • Greenwashing
  • Promoting your company as sustainable when it causes environmental harm
  • Using plastics at every stop along your supply chain

As marketers, we have the power to create (and amplify) change. The quality and scale of that change depends largely on the product. But you can still make sustainable choices in your marketing strategy regardless of the brands you’re tied to.

Previous: 3) Tactics
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4) Sustainability

Sustainable business practices are important to our team. And we are not alone. Increasingly, more and more consumers want to see their market choices create a positive impact on society and the environment. 

Accordingly, brands have to align with the priorities of their customers. This means that even companies with vested interests in fossil fuel production (think: BP) are launching campaigns around sustainability. 

But what does this shift towards sustainability mean for digital marketers? 

We believe that marketers should be as transparent as possible about the sustainability of their brands and products, and actively work to improve unsustainable products and practices where possible.

For many companies, ourselves and our clients included, sustainability is a journey. No company is perfect. It’s the work we do to increase the sustainability of our brands and products that makes a difference. So, for marketers in this position we advocate two things: being transparent about your company’s sustainability now, and working towards a more sustainable future. That might be driven by product marketing, market data showing consumer demand for sustainable options, or something else.

What does this look like in practice?

Marketing for sustainable and not-so-sustainable products alike, here are some do’s and don’ts you can adopt to really bring it home:

Follow ethical practices like these:

  • Prioritize working with companies that value sustainability
  • Be honest about the sustainability of your product
  • If you are working on an unsustainable product, work to improve sustainability practices at the product-marketing level
  • Get certified, and talk about your certifications in your marketing materials

Avoid the following unethical practices:

  • Greenwashing
  • Promoting your company as sustainable when it causes environmental harm
  • Using plastics at every stop along your supply chain

As marketers, we have the power to create (and amplify) change. The quality and scale of that change depends largely on the product. But you can still make sustainable choices in your marketing strategy regardless of the brands you’re tied to.